Frequently Asked Questions

White Tail Solar will be located on approximately 1,160 acres of flat, dry, undeveloped land in York Township and Augusta Township, most of which is currently farmed. View a full-sized map.

White Tail Solar represents a $130 million investment that will, over the project’s lifetime, generate millions of dollars in local tax revenue while using no county or township services. White Tail Solar is projected to generate over $1.43 million in tax revenue in the first year alone, based on current Michigan law. Of that $1.43 million, approximately $111,000 will go directly to Augusta Township and $47,000 will go directly to York Township. These tax dollars will benefit schools, roads and other local services.

In addition, the White Tail Solar project is expected to generate approximately 150 construction jobs in Michigan, drawing principally from the Southeast Michigan workforce. Once the project is constructed and in operation, the project is expected to create two permanent solar operations jobs.

To learn more, view the economic impact study by Anderson Economic Group: Economic Impact of the White Tail Solar Energy Project

Based on input from the community, White Tail Solar increased project setbacks from residences and will exceed the setback requirements in the township ordinance. White Tail Solar is going above and beyond setback requirements by maintaining a minimum distance of 150 feet between all residences and solar arrays. Further, the solar arrays will be set back a minimum of 75 feet from all public road rights-of-way.

The White Tail Solar project is designed to be harmonious with the surrounding area. The project’s landscape buffers are consistent with township requirements and were developed based on feedback from the local community. White Tail Solar is going above and beyond to install increased buffering along neighboring property lines as well as along roadways. Evergreens, shrubs and existing vegetation will all be utilized as landscaping.

vegetative buffers

Numerous studies conducted around the country have found that solar projects have no negative impact on adjacent property values.

 

The White Tail Solar project will generate minimal sound. Solar panels do not create sound, and the motors that rotate the panels are quiet and will have no perceptible sound at the fence of the facility.

The inverters that convert the DC power produced by the panels to transmission-grid compatible AC power make a slight hum when in use only during the day, which would be inaudible to anyone outside the project area.

White Tail Solar conducted a sound analysis, which demonstrates that the sound generated by the project will be minimal for surrounding property. According to this study, the amount of sound generated by the project will be less than 65 dBA from all property lines. For comparison, a whisper at three feet is about 25dBA; normal conversation at three feet is about 60 dBA.

Review the study:

The White Tail Solar project will not cause glare to drivers, occupants of adjacent lands, or to the users and operators of nearby airports and landing strips. Solar panels generate electricity through absorption of sunlight and are designed to minimize and avoid light reflection, making glare minimal. The panels will also be coated with an anti-reflective coating.

White Tail Solar conducted a Glare Hazard Analysis, which confirms the White Tail Solar project is not predicted to cause glare. Review the White Tail Solar Glare Hazard Analysis.

White Tail Solar is projected to generate over $1.43 million in tax revenue in the first year alone, based on current Michigan law. Of that $1.43 million, approximately $111,000 will go directly to Augusta Township and $47,000 will go directly to York Township. These tax dollars will benefit schools, roads and other local services.

To learn more, view the economic impact study by Anderson Economic Group: Economic Impact of the White Tail Solar Energy Project

White Tail Solar will create an estimated 150 local construction jobs, as well as two long-term jobs after construction.

To learn more, view the economic impact study by Anderson Economic Group: Economic Impact of the White Tail Solar Energy Project

Solar panels are a safe and effective technology that comply with all health and safety regulations. The primary material in the panel itself is silicon, a very common earth element used in cement, ceramics, glass and many other products.

LONGi Solar, a leading global solar panel manufacturer,  has provided a letter that confirms there is no knowledge of any groundwater or other pollution issues resulting from the use of its panels at any commercial site. Review the letter from LONGi Solar.

The White Tail Solar Project will be constructed to the highest industry standards, including the use of tier 1 solar panels. The solar panels do not contain dangerous Gen X or PFAS chemicals. In fact, in 2018, DowDupont – the leading manufacturer of backsheets for tier 1 solar panels – issued a statement confirming that they do not use Gen X or PFAS in their backsheets.

Yes, solar energy is one of the lowest impact forms of energy production. Solar panels are low to the ground, do not produce any greenhouse gas emissions, are almost completely silent, and do not create odors or harmful byproducts.

Solar panels will not release any toxic or hazardous substances into the environment and no such substances are used during operation of the project. They also do not deplete natural resources or cause environmental damage through resource extraction and transportation. In addition, solar panels do not use significant amounts of water during operation, keeping this water available for farming and other activities.

The White Tail Solar Project will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 219,675.4 tons, which is equivalent to taking 219,364 cars off the road.

The panels do not produce a great deal of heat, but like any surface, could be warm to the touch on a hot sunny day. The panels would return to ambient temperature at night.

Solar projects are a temporary use of the land and all project infrastructure will be removed at the end of the life of the White Tail Solar Project. Per land agreements and county requirements, Ranger Power is required to restore the land to its pre-existing condition.

We encourage you to send a letter to your local officials and let them know that you support private property rights, local farmers, economic development and solar energy in your community. To make this quick and easy, send a message of support through our online form.

Sources:
1. Economic Impact of the White Tail Solar Energy Project by Anderson Economic Group, March 2019
2. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a Typical Passenger Vehicle by the Environmental Protection Agency
3. Impact Report – White Tail Solar Project by Ann Arbor Spark, August 2020

A Community-First Approach

A strong partnership with local residents is key, which is why Ranger Power takes a community-first approach by directly engaging residents through personal outreach. While the COVID-19 pandemic is preventing in-person community meetings and forums, Ranger Power is still available to answer questions over the phone or by email.